News Updates

  • Contact-sport brain trauma may affect personality and cognition

    Source: Medical News Today


    Scientists have discovered that repeated brain trauma, which commonly occurs in athletes, may affect behavior, mood and thinking abilities, according to a study published in the journal Neurology.


    All athletes had been diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) following death. CTE is a brain disease linked to repeated brain trauma – most commonly found in athletes.

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  • Insomnia helped with exercise – eventually

    Source: Medical News Today


    A new US study finds that it takes as long as four months for patients with insomnia to benefit from regular daily exercise.


    It also finds that poor sleep can cause people to reduce the amount of exercise they do, and the researchers urge people with insomnia to persist and not expect exercise to be a quick cure.

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  • Retired NFL players may not suffer unique cognitive disorder

    Source: Medical News Today


    The media have widely reported that retired NFL players are at risk for a neurodegenerative disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which causes symptoms such as aggression, depression, suicidality and progressive dementia.

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  • Fitness facilities more likely to have AEDs which improve survival odds following sudden cardiac arrest

    Source: Medical News Today


    People experiencing sudden cardiac arrest at exercise facilities have a higher chance of survival than at other indoor locations, likely due to early CPR and access to an automated external defibrillator (AED), among other factors, according to a study published online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The findings underscore the importance of having AEDs in places where people exert themselves and are at greater risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

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  • Combating Sports-Related Concussions: New Device Accurately and Objectively Diagnoses Concussions from the Sidelines

    Source: Science daily


    In the United States there are millions of sports-related concussions each year, but many go undiagnosed because for some athletes, the fear of being benched trumps the fear of permanent brain damage, and there is no objective test available to accurately diagnose concussions on the sidelines.


    Balance tests are a primary method used to detect concussion. The current means of scoring these tests relies on the skill of athletic trainers to visually determine whether or not a concussion has occurred.

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